International

ICAN is a project of UNESCO IOC´s IODE Programme, and ICAN members seek to play a leadership role in forging international collaborations of value to the participating nations, thereby optimizing regional governance in coastal zone management and marine spatial planning.

Coastal

We live on a blue planet, with oceans and seas covering more than 70 per cent of the Earth’s surface. Oceans feed us, regulate our climate, and generate most of the oxygen we breathe. Some 37 per cent of the world's population lives within 100 km of the coast. (UNEP)

Atlas

CWAs are "...collections of digital maps and datasets with supplementary tables, illustrations, & information that systematically illustrate the coast, oftentimes with cartographic & decision support tools, all of which are accessible via the Internet."  O'Dea et al., 2007

Network

Membership in ICAN is open to all interested parties who agree to the mission & objectives of ICAN, including those with an operational coastal web atlas, as well as those hoping to design and build a coastal web atlas in the future.
Join us!

¡Únete a nosotros!

Overview of the Caribbean Marine Atlas

The Caribbean Marine Atlas (CMA) is a regional project involving several countries within the Wider Caribbean Basin in a joint effort to promote sound decision-making through access to high-quality coastal and marine spatial information. The purpose of the CMA is to identify, collect and organize available spatial datasets into an atlas of environmental themes for the Caribbean region. The project is currently under the sponsorship of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's (IOC) International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) and Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) Programmes.  The embodiment of the goal of the project is an online mapping and data management application available to environmental managers and other users both within and outside of the Wider Caribbean Region.

In addition, using the skills obtained through the capacity building component of the CMA project, participating countries are in the process of developing national marine atlases based on the structure and functionality of the regional atlas but focused on the national coastal/marine area management priorities of the respective states. Thus the CMA will, through its products and services available at the national level, directly contribute to the sustainable development and integrated management of marine and coastal areas in the region.

All programme activities under the project have been developed and conducted with the above factors as their raison d’être. As a result the CMA programme has the potential to be one of the most significant recent advancements in coastal area management through the development of tools and processes which promote actual fact-based decision making.

Accomplishments

The CMA project is currently in its second phase which began in late 2009 and has already achieved many of its primary goals. These include capacity building within the sphere of marine data management, the production of developer and user resource materials for CMA technologies, and the development of a basic web-based mapping application. Specific achievements and/or activities under these project areas are outlined below.

Capacity Building

A network of Caribbean data managers benefitted from IODE training courses in ocean data management, data mining and web atlas development conducted during phase 1 of the CMA.

Specific training was given for atlas developers via the CMA Training Course on PostgreSQL, PostGIS and OpenLayers for Web-Based Atlas Development in Bridgetown, Barbados in April of 2011.

The development of web-based mapping applications has resulted in the exposure to and growing familiarity with several coding languages (Javascript, PHP, HTML, XML) and software platforms (GeoServer, GeoNetwork).

Development of Resource Materials

The main CMA website www.caribbeanmarineatlas.net is host to information on all of the training courses, planning meetings and national stakeholder meetings conducted as part of the CMA project.

A user manual for the mapping application has been developed and is also available on the main site
Resource materials directly related to national atlas development efforts and other developer-specific materials are available in a section of the main website not open to the general public.

Mapping Application Development

The CMA mapping application has been constructed from three components:

The web map server (GeoServer) http://geonetwork.iode.org/geoserver/web/ hosts the data available under the CMA project (and other IODE projects), publishes the data as a web map service (WMS) for use by the CMA mapping application, but also for any interested party.

The metadata catalog for CMA data (GeoNetwork) http://geonetwork.iode.org/geonetworkCMA/srv/en/main.home hosts the metadata information associated with published CMA datasets, allows users to search for datasets (and any other spatially enabled content) by geographic area.

The mapping application user interface (accessible via the Map Page tab on the main CMA site) allows users basic GIS control over available spatial datasets including query functionality, legends and links to metadata records.

Current Status of the CMA Project

There are several activities relating to the development of both the regional atlas and national atlases are currently being conducted, including:

  • The development of a code template for national atlases,
  • Improving the functionality of the regional atlas,
  • Formatting and uploading additional datasets, and
  • Data gathering for national atlas development projects.


Future of the project

Between 2012 and 2013, several activities are expected to be completed to fulfill the goals of the CMA project, these include:

  • The rollout of several national coastal/marine atlases based on the CMA,
  • Additional national stakeholder meetings,
  • The improvement of functionality for both national and regional atlases,
  • Atlas user and developer training,
  • National-level atlas promotion, and
  • The development of an atlas sustainability strategy

Progress of Sustainable Development Goal 14 in 2018

Advancing the sustainable use and conservation of the oceans continues to require effective strategies and management to combat the adverse effects of overfishing, growing ocean acidification and worsening coastal eutrophication. The expansion of protected areas for marine biodiversity, intensification of research capacity and increases in ocean science funding remain critically important to preserve marine resources.

The global share of marine fish stocks that are within biologically sustainable levels declined from 90 per cent in 1974 to 69 per cent in 2013.

Studies at open ocean and coastal sites around the world show that current levels of marine acidity have increased by about 26 per cent on average since the start of the Industrial Revolution. Moreover, marine life is being exposed to conditions outside previously experienced natural variability.

Global trends point to continued deterioration of coastal waters due to pollution and eutrophication. Without concerted efforts, coastal eutrophication is expected to increase in 20 per cent of large marine ecosystems by 2050.

As of January 2018, 16 per cent (or over 22 million square kilometres) of marine waters under national jurisdiction—that is, 0 to 200 nautical miles from shore—were covered by protected areas. This is more than double the 2010 coverage level. The mean coverage of marine key biodiversity areas (KBAs) that are protected has also increased—from 30 per cent in 2000 to 44 per cent in 2018.

Sustainable Development Goal 14: Life Under Water

 

Targets

 

Indicators

14.1

By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution

14.1.1

Index of coastal eutrophication and floating plastic debris density

14.2

By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

14.2.1

Proportion of national exclusive economic zones managed using ecosystem-based approaches

14.3

Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels

14.3.1

Average marine acidity (pH) measured at agreed suite of representative sampling stations

14.4

By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics

14.4.1

Proportion of fish stocks within biologically sustainable levels

14.5

By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information

14.5.1

 
Coverage of protected areas in relation to marine areas

14.6

By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation

14.6.1

Progress by countries in the degree of implementation of international instruments aiming to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing

14.7

By 2030, increase the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism

14.7.1

Sustainable fisheries as a percentage of GDP in small island developing States, least developed countries and all countries

14.A

Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries

14.A.1

Proportion of total research budget allocated to research in the field of marine technology

14.B

Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets

14.B.1

Progress by countries in the degree of application of a legal/regulatory/policy/institutional framework which recognizes and protects access rights for small-scale fisheries

14.C

Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of The Future We Want

14.C.1

Number of countries making progress in ratifying, accepting and implementing through legal, policy and institutional frameworks, ocean-related instruments that implement international law, as reflected in the United Nation Convention on the Law of the Sea, for the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans and their resources

Para nuestras Costas

Vol, 8, Nr 2 - Now Available!

We are now entering our 9th year publishing the ICAN newsletter. Many thanks to our Editor Andy Sherin!

Please consider preparing an article for the next newsletter that will likely be published in the spring of this year.

Happy New Year!

Photos from CoastGIS 2018

Our friends from CoastGIS 2018 have posted a wonderful gallery of photos, including the recent ICAN mini-workshop:

See how many ICAN members you can spot!